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  • Like every year, in occasion of the National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) 2019 New York Gala, members of New York’s Italian American community congregated at the iconic Cipriani 42nd Street to celebrate the achievements of outstanding members of the region’s Italian American and Italian Community.
  • Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper (Photo Credit: ABC)
    Let’s face it: the 2019 Academy Awards ceremony won’t be remembered as an Italian-American night, yet we owe a few rare highlights in an otherwise soporific TV gala to some Italian American artists. Thank you Lady Gaga, Bradley Cooper, and Nick Vallelonga (through the surprise victory of “Green Book”). Also, a shout out to Bob Persichetti and Italian Sara Pichelli for their “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” which won Best Animated Feature.
  • Boccadasse, a former fishermen’s village now part of Genoa, Liguria.
    Living the Italian Dream: Part IV. Marilyn Ricci went to Italy to meet her Italian relatives and then decided to settle in Chiavari. 100% Italian-American raised within a huge Italian-American family, in 2015 she founded a travel company that assists others like her to find their Italian town or region of origin.
  • Boston Public Library (detail) Sacco & Vanzetti demonstration in Boston, March 1, 1925
    Consider nominating a 1927 immigrant recording protesting on behalf of Sacco and Vanzetti to the National Recording Registry.
  • Art & Culture
    Amy Riolo(January 03, 2018)
    A journey through DC’s Italian roots while enjoying its contemporary Italian-centric culture. The city’s strong ties to the Italian sense of beauty have remained steady through modern times.
  • Meet artist Margaret Ricciardi, born 103 years ago in Brooklyn to immigrants from Calitri (Avellino). Joining her in as she recounts her family memories and her life as an artist, is Margaret’s niece, Laura Erikson. This interview is a preview, part of the Second Season of the I-ITALY TV SERIES "Grandparents and Grandchildren in Italian America." And stay tuned for the full video.
  • Joseph Guagliardo, national president of the Conference of Presidents of Major Italian-American Organizations
    Joseph Guagliardo, national president of the Conference of Presidents of Major Italian-American Organizations, recounts how the “Columbus Controversy” started in New York and explains why it touches all Italian Americans, “both the blue-collars and the bluebloods,” as he says. He emphasizes that his family came to the U.S. in 1906 and had nothing to do with American slavery or what Columbus did 550 years ago—on which, he notes, scholars still disagree. “We came looking for a better life. We learned about Columbus in school here, and it became our thing.”

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