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  • Art & Culture
    Fred Plotkin(July 10, 2015)
    Fred Plotkin, one of America's foremost experts on opera, meets with the mayor of Florence Dario Nardella in New York. They discussed his city and its music scene—rich but usually overshadowed by its more popular visual masterpieces— as well as the new initiatives that the City is launching to promote many aspects of Florence’s cultural heritage
  • "Being Leonardo da Vinci," written by and starring Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, depicts the Renaissance Man in all his glory as he is interviewed by a modern day journalist. The format is rather unique: old Leonardo sits across a reporter who asks him about anything, partly in English, partly in Renaissance Italian and partly in dance.
  • Salon/Sanctuary Concerts offers the New York public the opportunity to “travel” to Medieval Florence, Italy through two extraordinary musical performances featuring an organist from the Duomo of Florence and a globally acclaimed countertenor from across the Atlantic.
  • One of Leonardo da Vinci’s priceless masterpieces of a Renaissance noblewoman, lost for centuries, found in 2013, then lost once more until being rediscovered this summer. Finally Italian and Swiss police were able to reclaim the lost painting upon discovering of “advanced stage” negotiations to sell it.
  • Pulitzer Prize- and Oscar-winning John Patrick Shanley is best known for his riveting Broadway play Doubt, which he has since rewritten as a screen-play and a movie, as well as his Hollywood hit Moonstruck, which won three Academy Awards. He is also a theater and film director. And above all, he loves Italy and Italian America.
  • The Illinois based company Arma Lite latest advertisement depicting Michelangelo’s David holding a bolt-action rifle, with a caption that describes it as ‘A work of art’, has prompted a bitter reaction from the Italian Culture Minister Franceschini, as he considers the image to be offensive and to be violating the law.
  • It travels at speeds of up to 300 kilometers per hour between Milan, Rome and Naples. The new high-speed train is a welcomed novelty featuring innovative features, exclusive customer service and valuable traveling time. Most of all: it does not belong to the monopolistic, state-supported company 'Ferrovie dello Stato'. Is Italy finally going to open up to market competition in such a strategic sector as railway transportation?

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